Tag Archives: marketing

You Have 9 Seconds To Fascinate A Client – Spend 1 Hour With Sally Hogshead First

Sally Hogshead had to unlearn how to be boring.

Thanks to web browsing, the average attention span is now approximately nine seconds, according to a BBC report. That happens to be the same attention span as a goldfish.

Why is this important for marketers and advertisers? It means you’d better make a good first impression, and fast.

Look: a squirrel!

Still with me?

Whether you’re a brand, or a bachelor trying to find your soul mate on Match.com, you have only nine seconds to make an introduction, to make a connection. If you fail, you may never get another chance.

So how do you make the most of micro-attention spans? Sally Hogshead has the answer: Fascinate.

As the author of “Fascinate: Your 7 Triggers to Persuasion and Captivation,” Sally has to be at her most fascinating every time she speaks. And she certainly didn’t disappoint during her keynote presentation at a recent Linked Orange County gathering. Continue reading

There’s a Mobile App for Almost Everything, Even High School

You know mobile is mainstream when your kid's high school has its own mobile app.

Fortune 500 marketers aren’t the only ones taking advantage of mobile apps these days. Smart phone technology is making new inroads into places like coffee houses, barbers and even high schools.

How mainstream is mobile? The number of people owning a smart phone rose 10 percent in three months over the summer, to 82.2 million according to comScore Inc. Out of 234 million people using mobile devices in the U.S., 35.1 percent have a “smart phone.”

What makes a phone smart is that it can run “apps” (short for “applications,” but you probably knew that).

Are you smarter than an 11th grader?

When I was in high school, there were no cell phones. As a junior I wrote for the school newspaper, and it was a big deal just to put out a paper once a month.

Now a 16-year-old junior named Zachary Christopoulos has created an app for his high school. (Boy, do I feel like an underachiever.)

The first mobile app for a high school

Tesoro High School in South Orange County is the first high school to have its own mobile app available for download on the iTunes App Store. The app is free for both iPhone and Android smart phones. Continue reading

Where Where You When Steve Jobs Died?

How did you find out about Steve Jobs death?

Years from now, will you remember? I think I will, which is why it’s worth at least a blog post.

I first heard about Steve Jobs passing via Twitter. On my MacBook Pro. The poetry of the “coincidence” didn’t escape me. As Matthias Worch put it, “That’s not a bad way to go.”

iHeaven. A poetic tribute.

We have the technology, so let’s put it to use in remembering one of the pioneers who made it all possible. Steve Jobs not only helped create a new industry with the Macintosh personal computer, but also revolutionized software, music distribution, digital moviemaking, smart phones and tablet computing. And along the way, Apple also put out some pretty mean advertising, usually in collaboration with agency TBWA Chiat/Day.

Here’s the TV commercial that launched the Apple Macintosh computer. It’s widely regarded as one of the best, most effective adverts ever made. Directed by Ridley Scott, the spot aired only once in January 1984, but it turned the Superbowl into the advertising showcase it’s become today.


RIP Steve, and thanks for showing us how to Think Different. “Because the people who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.”

 

12 Simple Yet Powerful Relationship Marketing Tips from Mari Smith

 

Mari Smith at Linked Orange County with her new BFF Mitch Devine.

Mari Smith sure has a lot of friends. Just check out her 50,288 Facebook fan-friends or 119,468 Twitter followers. But she’s really not looking for more BFFs. Her goal is quality, not quantity.

Mari wants to have more meaningful relationships.

Mari (as in “Ferrari”) is in business to be of service and build relationships. Why are relationships so important? “The longer relationships are sustained, the more profitable your company,” she explains.

The topic of Mari’s recent presentation at Linked Orange County, “The New Relationship Marketing,” also happens to be the title of her new book.

Mari has called herself a “relationship marketing specialist” for 10 years, long before social media became a buzzword. Known as the “Pied Piper of Facebook,” she’s the co-author of “Facebook Marketing: One-Hour a Day”.

To dispel the notion that her subject was limited to social media, she addressed her audience saying “There is no amount of sophisticated technology that will ever, ever, ever take the place of this: in-person, face-to-face.”

Relationships Transcend Social Media

According to Mari, “Relationship marketing encompasses not only social media, but also email marketing, direct mail, some television and magzine ads—basically anything in which you make the person you’re connecting with feel they’re important to you.”

Starbucks was cited as one of the best examples of companies that listen well and connect with customers. The coffeehouse chain consistently ranks at the top for customer engagement. Based on the results of its own survey, Starbucks acted in response to customers’ feedback on how they could improve. The number-one suggestion? Free wi-fi.

Tactical Marketing Tips

Mari’s goal with her presentation, besides talking about her new book, was to deliver tactical tips to her audience. I’ve compiled some of my personal favorites that apply to business in general as well as social media marketing. I’ve listed a dozen below, plus a few extra nuggets as well. Continue reading

Advertising Tributes to 9-11

American Airlines ran this ad following the attacks of September 11, 2001.

In the wake of September 11, 2001, advertisers struggled to find the right tone in their communications. It didn’t seem appropriate to try to be funny following the devastating terrorist attacks that took nearly 3,000 lives. But it was also difficult to appear serious and sincere while promoting a commercial venture.

Sympathy Ads

The vast majority of print advertising that ran in the immediate aftermath offered sympathy and condolences. Businesses that had been located in the World Trade Center expressed remorse over the loss of their employees and vowed to continue.

I was amazed to see the variety of condolence ads that came from countries all over the world, including the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia where the majority of hijackers were originally from. For a while I saved a file with many of these ads, but it got to be overwhelming. I now wish I had some of them to post a few images for you.

Life—and even advertising—had to go on. Continue reading

Taco Bell Bites Back with Ad Aimed at Hungry Attorneys

Taco Bell asks attorneys for an apology. Not that they really expect to get one. After all, that would mean admitting they were wrong.

Where’s the beef” was an ad slogan for Wendy’s back in 1984. But lately it’s been a charge leveled at Taco Bell by a law firm out to pick the fast food giant’s deep pockets.

Alabama-based law firm Beasley Allen Crow Methvin Portis & Miles (now there’s a mouthful) claimed that Taco Bell’s mystery meat was comprised of only 35 percent beef, based on an unspecified test by an unnamed analyst. Taco Bell insisted their beef was 88 percent beef, 12 percent “Secret Recipe.”

Taco Bell fought back with hard-hitting ads in January that said: “Thank you for suing us. Here’s the truth about our seasoned beef…”

Obviously someone smelled a meal ticket. As USA Today reported, “With annual sales pushing $7 billion, Taco Bell ranks as the nation’s sixth-largest fast-food company, according to the 2009 findings from the research firm Technomic. Continue reading

Atlas Shrugged The Movie – John Galt Goes Spartacus

The target audience for the new Atlas Shrugged movie, doing their own advertising for it. (Photographed in Santa Ana, California, April 15, 2010.)

Here’s a challenge for marketers: How do you promote a low-budget independent movie without any stars? A film based on a verbose 1,000-plus-page novel about a philosophy called “Objectivism.” Got a campaign yet?

(Hint: social media, of course!)

Atlas Shrugged, Part 1” arrives in theaters on April 15 —“tax day” in the U.S., the traditional deadline for filing income tax returns. Coincidence? (Sure, just like the sudden omnipresence of Highway Patrol issuing a lot of piddly traffic tickets in a futile effort to bail California out of debt. But that’s another story.)

Before we get to the marketing of the movie, a little background about the book.

Communism vs. Capitalism

Published in 1957, Atlas Shrugged is Ayn Rand’s magnum opus. The author lived through the communist revolution in Russia and came to America because its capitalist free-market system represented her ideal of a free society. As the book jacket summarizes, Atlas is the story of a man who said he would stop the motor of the world—and did. But that doesn’t quite explain the story’s relevance today. Continue reading

Mobile Advertising on Steroids

This mobile truck wrap was hard to miss.

I think I sprained my eyes looking at this truck wrap. Now he’s probably going to hunt me down and make me drop and give him 50.

Marketing Music at NAMM

NAMM is the show where rock stars come out to play.

All the Convention Center's a stage at NAMM.

If you’re keeping up with social marketing trendsetters like Seth Godin or Scott Stratten, you’ve probably heard it said that we do business with people we “know, like and trust.” This is especially true for the music business. Relationships (read: connections) have always been key for musicians. And January’s Winter NAMM show in Anaheim is where music business ties are made and strengthened.

While other trade shows are dying out, and the music industry itself struggles with a revolution in distribution and marketing, NAMM (National Association of Music Merchants) continues to grow in popularity. Continue reading

This Year Goes To 11

Take it to 11 at NAMM. That's one louder.

The 2011 NAMM Show (shorthand for what used to be known as the National Association of Music Merchants) has taken its thematic inspiration from the Rob Reiner rockumentary satire film, This Is Spinal Tap, in which Nigel Tufnel explains the advantages of having an amp that goes all the way to 11. It’s a perfect reference for their audience.

NAMM is where musicians, instrument makers and related music companies come to do business and show their latest gear. It’s like a Guitar Center on steroids that’s as big as the Anaheim Convention Center (bigger, actually). The place is so thick with rock stars, you practically trip over ‘em every time you turn around.

Here’s how the NAMMsters describe this year’s show on the website: ”On a scale of 1 to 10, we’re taking it to 11 and so can you! The 2011 NAMM Show has everything you need to turn it up a notch in your business, from the hottest new music products offered by 1500+ exhibitors to free business-building training customized to the challenges of today’s industry professionals.” Continue reading