Tag Archives: Twitter

12 Simple Yet Powerful Relationship Marketing Tips from Mari Smith

 

Mari Smith at Linked Orange County with her new BFF Mitch Devine.

Mari Smith sure has a lot of friends. Just check out her 50,288 Facebook fan-friends or 119,468 Twitter followers. But she’s really not looking for more BFFs. Her goal is quality, not quantity.

Mari wants to have more meaningful relationships.

Mari (as in “Ferrari”) is in business to be of service and build relationships. Why are relationships so important? “The longer relationships are sustained, the more profitable your company,” she explains.

The topic of Mari’s recent presentation at Linked Orange County, “The New Relationship Marketing,” also happens to be the title of her new book.

Mari has called herself a “relationship marketing specialist” for 10 years, long before social media became a buzzword. Known as the “Pied Piper of Facebook,” she’s the co-author of “Facebook Marketing: One-Hour a Day”.

To dispel the notion that her subject was limited to social media, she addressed her audience saying “There is no amount of sophisticated technology that will ever, ever, ever take the place of this: in-person, face-to-face.”

Relationships Transcend Social Media

According to Mari, “Relationship marketing encompasses not only social media, but also email marketing, direct mail, some television and magzine ads—basically anything in which you make the person you’re connecting with feel they’re important to you.”

Starbucks was cited as one of the best examples of companies that listen well and connect with customers. The coffeehouse chain consistently ranks at the top for customer engagement. Based on the results of its own survey, Starbucks acted in response to customers’ feedback on how they could improve. The number-one suggestion? Free wi-fi.

Tactical Marketing Tips

Mari’s goal with her presentation, besides talking about her new book, was to deliver tactical tips to her audience. I’ve compiled some of my personal favorites that apply to business in general as well as social media marketing. I’ve listed a dozen below, plus a few extra nuggets as well. Continue reading

Tweet This: Top 5 UnMarketing Twitter Tips

Scott Stratten spreads UnMarketing awesomeness at LinkedOC.

When you go to an UnMarketing event, there’s no need to turn off or even silence your cell phone. (As long as your ringtone is not by Ke$ha.) That’s because Scott Stratten, author of UnMarketing, wants you to tweet about it. You see, Scott is not ashamed to admit he loves Twitter.

“I Speak In Tweets”

That’s how Scott Stratten started off his keynote at the most recent LinkedOC event organized by Bryan Elliott. True to his word, Scott’s talk was filled with pithy UnNuggets that could be sent out in 140 characters or less. (Only problem was the cell phone reception—or rather, unreception—was spotty at best.) Just in case there was any doubt about when to tweet, Scott would pause just a little too long and give a big exaggerated wink. He’s subtle like that.

Scott Stratten on social media ROI: "Every time you ask for ROI on Twitter, a kitten dies." And Scott makes a face.

Engagement 2.0

Hosted by Gothic Moon Studios in Orange, the theme of the evening was engagement, which also happens to be part of the subtitle of his book: “Stop Marketing. Start Engaging.” While engagement is not exactly a new idea, the way Scott packages and delivers it is refreshingly humorous and direct. And his book reads a lot like the way he speaks. (Probably because he dictated much of it with voice-to-text software. See page 108.)

By the way, be sure to read the footnotes in UnMarketing, because they’re mostly snarky asides. In fact, Scott is so genuine, he even looks like his avatar picture in person. Always a good thing.

Scott Stratten is always branding, always UnMarketing. Yes, even this can be considered branding.

The 30-Day Twitter Challenge

A couple years ago, Scott was about to give up on Twitter as a networking tool (see Chapter 17: How Twitter Changed My Business). But before he bailed completely, he was willing to give it one last push. A 30-Day Twitter Challenge. So with about 2,000 followers at that point, he virtually lived on Twitter for the next month. That’s when he saw the light and became a true Twitter believer.

After his 30-day challenge, he had 10,000 followers and was “hooked.” Stratten writes, “I had made better and stronger relationships in that time span than all the other social networking sites combined. I had built a loyal following, booked speaking engagements, and gained consulting clients, without ever pitching a thing.”

One of the main reasons he believes in the power of Twitter is the absence of any barrier to engagement. Unlike Facebook and LinkedIn, Twitter doesn’t require permission or approval for you to follow and engage anyone you like.

Here are Scott Stratten’s Top 5 Twitter Tips from UnMarketingContinue reading

Old Spice Guy Spends Two Days In Bathroom, Blows Up YouTube

Isaiah Mustafa as the Old Spice Guy, the hardest working man in the bathroom.

After two days and two hundred kajillion personalized videos, even the Old Spice Guy has to take a break and come out of the bathroom.

Please forgive the link overload here, but after spending the last 48 hours or so in front of a camera, the Old Spice Guy (Isaiah Mustafa in real life) has been overwhelming social media channels by tweeting links to customized videos made for fans with his bare hands.

The suave smelling dude responded directly to ordinary average fans from Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, gave shout-outs to corporate pals like Starbucks, GQ and sister company Gillette, nods to influential blogger fans like Perez Hilton and Guy Kawasaki (“Is there a Girl Kawasaki?”!), props to celebrity friends like Ellen Degeneres, Ryan Seacrest, Apolo Anton Ohno, and Ashton Kutcher. He wowed Mrs. Kutcher by bashing a pirate piñata, courted Alyssa Milano with roses, wooed Rose McGowan, successfully proposed marriage on behalf of fan JS Beals, and admitted he’s only human and will eventually die someday. He even responded to himself (Isaiah Mustafa). Continue reading